Creating a Library Database

This section walks you through creating a library database. To do this, start by creating a new Access database in the database format of your choice. You can create and save a database directly in the older .mda library database format, but for the new .accda format, you need to first create the database as an .accdb database, then change its extension to .accda later, in an Explorer pane, ignoring the dire warning that the file might become unusable.

Next, you need to create the USysReglnfo table to hold the crucial Registry information. As a shortcut, you can import this table from another library database (either .mda or .accda format), if you have one available; you may have to first make system tables visible, as described in this section. I recommend importing this table, because it will save you time in entering some very cryptic information, though of course you have to add (or modify) rows in the table with specific data for your add-in.

The USysReglnfo table is a system table, so you won't see it (or be able to edit its contents) unless you check the "Show System Objects" checkbox. In previous versions of Access, this checkbox was located on the View page of the Options dialog; in Access 2007 it is on the Navigation Options dialog, which can be opened in the following manner:

1. Click the Office button in the upper-left corner of the Access window.

2. Next, click the Access Options button on the Office menu, as shown in Figure 14.2.

FIGURE 14.2

The Access 2007 Office menu.

FIGURE 14.2

The Access 2007 Office menu.

3. On the Access Options dialog, select the Current Database section, as shown in Figure 14.3.

FIGURE 14.3

The Current Database section of the Access Options dialog box.

FIGURE 14.3

The Current Database section of the Access Options dialog box.

4. Click the Navigation Options button to open the Navigation Options dialog, where finally you can check the "Show System Objects" checkbox, as shown in Figure 14.4.

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