The Toolbars tab

The Customize dialog box's Toolbars tab, shown in Figure 19-2, lists all the available toolbars, including toolbars you have created. This dialog box also lists the two menu bars (Worksheet and Chart), which are similar to toolbars.

Figure 19-2:

Toolbars tab is in the Customize dialog box.

Figure 19-2:

Toolbars tab is in the Customize dialog box.

This section describes how to perform various procedures that involve toolbars.

1 Hiding or displaying a toolbar: The Toolbars tab displays every toolbar (built-in toolbars and custom toolbars). Add a check mark to display a toolbar; remove the check mark to hide it. The changes take effect immediately.

1 Creating a new toolbar: Click the New button and enter a name in the New Toolbar dialog box. Excel creates and displays an empty toolbar. You can then add buttons (or menu commands) to the new toolbar. See "Adding and Removing Toolbar Controls" later in this chapter.

Figure 19-3 shows a custom toolbar that I created. This toolbar, called Custom Formatting, contains the formatting tools that I use most frequently. Notice that this toolbar includes drop-down menus as well as standard toolbar buttons.

1 Renaming a custom toolbar: Select the custom toolbar from the list and click the Rename button. In the Rename Toolbar dialog box, enter a new name. You can't rename a built-in toolbar.

1 Deleting a custom toolbar: Select the custom toolbar from the list and click the Delete button. You can't delete a built-in toolbar.

Deleting a toolbar is one of the few actions in Excel that cannot be undone.

Figure 19-3:

A custom toolbar.

Figure 19-3:

A custom toolbar.

^ Resetting a built-in toolbar: Select a built-in toolbar from the list and click the Reset button. The toolbar is restored to its default state. Any added custom tools are removed. Any removed default tools are restored. The Reset button is not available when a custom toolbar is selected.

^ Attaching a toolbar to a workbook: You can share a custom toolbar by attaching it to a workbook. Click the Attach button and you get a new dialog box that lets you select toolbars to attach to a workbook. You can attach any number of toolbars to a workbook — but remember, attaching toolbars increases the size of your workbook. For more about this, see "Distributing Toolbars," later in this chapter.

Toolbar autosensing

Normally, Excel displays a particular toolbar automatically when you change contexts. This is called autosensing. For example, when you activate a chart, the Chart toolbar appears. When you activate a sheet that contains a pivot table, the PivotTable toolbar appears.

You can easily defeat autosensing by hiding the toolbar: Click its Close button. After you do so, Excel no longer displays that toolbar when you switch to its former context. You can restore this automatic behavior by displaying the appropriate toolbar when you're in the appropriate context. Thereafter, Excel reverts to its normal automatic toolbar display when you switch to that context.

You can simulate this type of behavior by writing VBA code. Refer to "Displaying a toolbar when a worksheet is activated," later in this chapter.

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