Application

The final compatibility issue deals with language issues and international settings. Excel is available in many different language versions. The following statement displays the country code for the version of Excel:

MsgBox Appli'cati'on.International(xlCountryCode)

The United States/English version of Excel has a country code of 1. Other country codes are listed in Table 26-2.

Table 26-2 EXCEL COUNTRY CODES

Country

Country Code

English

1

Russian

7

Greek

30

Dutch

31

French

33

Spanish

34

Hungarian

36

Italian

39

Czech

42

Danish

45

Swedish

46

Norwegian

47

Polish

48

German

49

Portuguese (Brazil)

55

Thai

66

Japanese

81

Korean

82

Vietnamese

84

Simplified Chinese

86

Turkish

90

Indian

91

Urdu

92

Table 26-2 EXCEL COUNTRY CODES (Continued)

Country Country Code

Portuguese 351

Finnish 358

Traditional Chinese 886

Arabic 966

Hebrew 97 2

Farsi 982

If your application will be used by those who speak another language, you need to ensure that the proper language is used in your dialog boxes. Also, you need to identify the user's decimal and thousands separator characters. In the United States, these are almost always a period and a comma, respectively. However, users in other countries might have their systems set up to use other characters. Yet another issue is date and time formats: The United States is one of the few countries that use the (illogical) month/date/year format.

If you're developing an application that will be used only by people with your company, you probably won't need to be concerned with international compatibility. But if your company has offices throughout the world, or if you plan to distribute your application outside your country, you need to address a number of issues to ensure that your application will work properly. I discuss these issues in this section.

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