Digital Signatures

Ready

Figure 3-15

Ready

Figure 3-15

Access automatically resigns databases when they are in low security. Remember that in low security, all macros and projects are trusted. The reason that a new signature may be needed is that if a file has been modified in an earlier version of Access (or the signature is for some other reason invalidated), it will trigger a virus-warning message when it is reopened in Access 2003. One way to fix or prevent this annoying warning on your own files is to change to a low security setting, open and modify some part of the code, and then close the file. This will force the signature to be re-signed.

Access automatically re-signs databases that have been modified when they are in low security. For the sake of convenience and productivity, it is recommended that a project not be signed until it is ready to send to someone else or deploy. Doing development work on a signed database can cause extra database bloat. But, the effect of that can be minimized by frequently running Compact & Repair—which in general is a good idea, anyway. And, if you have a certificate for a security of a high level (that is, prompts for password before signing) then you may have to enter the password all the time.

If you have existing digital signatures, you can easily sign a VBA project. Go to the VBE window and click Tools, then Digital Signature; this will open the Digital Signature window as shown in Figure 3-16. One signature will cover VBA Code, Macros, Action Queries, and ActiveX control properties on Forms/Reports.

Figure 3-16
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